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Thread: An animated history

  1. #9
    Grouchy Old Anime Otaku LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata's Avatar
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    Re: An animated history

    Grumble Grumble Grumble

    If you want to look at websites with good write-ups on Anime culture and history, you can try...

    Anime Academy
    http://www.animeacademy.com/

    The Right Stuff International Resource Webpage...
    http://www.rightstuf.com/resource/resource.shtml

    the Anime University Page at Anime Info .org
    http://www.animeinfo.org/animeu.html
    FAVOURITE THREADS EXPLAIN why, or risk an infraction.
    Rantings of a Grouchy Old Anime Otaku

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    Newbie Cudwieser may be famous one day Cudwieser may be famous one day
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    Re: An animated history

    Theres another encyclopedia filled. Can you tell us of more modern anime (90's onwards) that have served to further the popularity of anime and manga. Also, are there any future projects that are likely to at least cause a stir (if not change) the market. Finally are there any exceptional (not nessecarily good) anime of note that have strayed from the mainstream to plough their own furrow?

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    Grouchy Old Anime Otaku LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata's Avatar
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    Re: An animated history

    Grumble Grumble Grumble Grumble Grumble

    Disclaimer: I don't claim to be a Manga expert, as my forte is Anime.... but...

    Significant works of Anime in the 1990s can be divided up into...

    Anime from significant manga artist/writers. The obvious examples are...
    -Rumiko Takahashi (Urusei Yatsura, Ranma 1/2, Mermaid Forest, Maison Ikkoku, Inuyasha)
    -Go Nagai (Cutey Honey, Devil Man, Devil Lady, Shin Getter Robo, Mazinger Z, Kekko Kamen, Getter Robo)
    -CLAMP (RG Veda, Magical Knight Rayearth, X (movie), Miyuki in Wonderland, Tokyo Babylon, CLAMP School Detective, Cardcaptor Sakura, Angelic Layer, X (TV), Chobits, Tsubasa, XXXHolic)
    -Hayao Miyazaki (Howl's Moving Castle, Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke, Porcco Rosso, Kiki's Delivery Service, My Neighbor Totoro, Castle in the Sky, Naussica of the Valley of the Wind)
    -Masamune Shirow (Appleseed OVA, Dominion Tank Police, New Dominion Tank Police, Ghost in the Shell (movie), Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence (Movie), Ghost in the Shell: Stand along complex (1st and 2nd TV series)

    Genre starting Anime
    -Nadia Secret of Blue Water: NHK (Japanase Public Broadcasting) and GAINEX Studio work that triggered the anime rebirth of the 90s

    -Tenchi Muyo Ryo-oki: First harem anime, and the most spinoff series that I know of. main series is 2 OVAs (plus a 3rd, still under production) 1 OVA Spinoff special (Mihoshi Special) 1 OVA Spinoff series (Magical Girl Pretty Sammy) 3 Spin off TV series (Tenchi Universe, Tenchi in Tokyo, Magical Girl Pretty Sammy) and 3 theatrical movie releases (Two from Tenchi Universe, and a 3rd that's a Hybrid between Tenchi Universe and the original OVA)

    -All Purpose Cultural Cat Girl Nuku Nuku: First battle android big sister/girlfriend genre

    -Sailor Moon: Triggered the rebirth of the 'dead' Magical Girl genre

    -Neon Genesis Evangelion: First God/Mecha genre, most controversial anime series ever made...

    -Those who Hunt Elves: Cheesy low quality series, but the first series specifically targeted for the post-midnight TV timeslot

    -Steel Angel Kurumi: First anime series created completely with 'no cell' computer graphic workstation technology...

    -Martian Successor Nadasico: First anime to spoof the anime fandom. Also beat Evangelion in the TV ratings, as both were shown in the same time period..

    -Record of Lodoss Wars: Best 'serious' fantasy series of the 90s

    -The Slayers: Best fantasy comedy series

    -Ghost in the Shell (First Movie) First anime movie targeted for a International release

    -Pokemon (Most successful video game to anime conversion, No if, and, or buts about it!! Also introduced more people to anime then any other series, as Pokemon went 'mainstream' before Dragon Ball Z)
    FAVOURITE THREADS EXPLAIN why, or risk an infraction.
    Rantings of a Grouchy Old Anime Otaku

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    Newbie Cudwieser may be famous one day Cudwieser may be famous one day
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    Question Re: An animated history

    cheers and thank you (if I can come up with something I mention it), but I have a small quiery for now. When was the second ghost in the shell movie released and where was it released? Also, were there any anime (taking into consideration the definitions of anime) produced outside of Japan?

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    I'm all ears. Hassun has disabled reputation
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    Re: An animated history

    Quote Originally Posted by Cudwieser
    cheers and thank you (if I can come up with something I mention it), but I have a small quiery for now. When was the second ghost in the shell movie released and where was it released? Also, were there any anime (taking into consideration the definitions of anime) produced outside of Japan?
    As it became more popular, alot of American cartoons were given anime influences and not only on the graphical level.
    Ever seen Totally Spies? It's a Charlies Angels-based cartoon with a anime graphical flavour.

    GitS 2 links:

    http://www.gofishpictures.com/GITS2/
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0347246/
    Last edited by Hassun; Jul 17, 2005 at 11:43 AM.

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    Newbie Cudwieser may be famous one day Cudwieser may be famous one day
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    Question Re: An animated history

    That wasn't what I was asking, but thanks all the same. What I want to know is if there were any full blown anime (by definition) that for reasons unknown were produced outside of japan (possibly using artists native to the host nation). I am aware that since the rise of anime world wide that a number of animations have been influenced by anime (I would be more surprised if cartoons in the us/uk weren't influenced).

  7. #15
    Grouchy Old Anime Otaku LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata's Avatar
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    Re: An animated history

    Grumble Grumble Grumble

    By definition, Anime is animation produced and targeted for a Japanese audience, so there aren't that many non-Japanese produced animation that had much of an impact. The majority of anime now produced uses 'out sourced' contractors in Korea, China and India to do in-betweening work and backgrounds, (and this trend goes as far back as 'Nadia: Secret of Blue Water' in 1989-1990, as the low quality 'island episodes' were outsourced to a Korean studio...) but it is only very recently that non-Japanese directed and produed series targeted for the Japanese market is being produced. (There is a Captain Harlock revival series that is currently being produced by a Korean studio...)

    For non-Japanese specific series, Warner Brothers (owner of Cartoon Network) made a considerable marketing effort pushing 'PowderPuff Girls' in Japan, and did achieve a moderate level of success, but it wasn't the break-out series it was hoped to be. The american MGM cartoon 'Tom and Jerry' made it into the NewType magazine pole of the top 100 animation of the 20th Century (in Japan), but the series really wasn't influential in the development of manga/anime.

    The only series that would be considered 'significant' in the development of Japanese manga/anime would be the 1930s series 'Betty Boop' and other works of the american Fleischer Studios, which had a noticeable influence on the character designs (as admitted by Osamu Tezuka) of 'Metropolis' and 'Astro Boy'...
    FAVOURITE THREADS EXPLAIN why, or risk an infraction.
    Rantings of a Grouchy Old Anime Otaku

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    Newbie Cudwieser may be famous one day Cudwieser may be famous one day
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    Re: An animated history

    Thanks. Now I want to know what the future trends for anime and manga are, both inside and outside japan. Also, will the internet/ online shopping have a larger influence on the access to anime and manga. Finally, on a tangent, will dvds (and other portable storage) eventually be replaced by downloads from the net?

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