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Thread: Differences in Anime Fandom inside/outside of Japan

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    Otaku sukotsu9 may be famous one day sukotsu9 may be famous one day sukotsu9's Avatar
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    Re: Differences in Anime Fandom inside/outside of Japan

    It stands to reason that the anime market (viewing audience) differs in Japan and the West solely because of the cultural differences. Certain themes and presentation styles will affect viewers with different ideologies differently. I'm not enough of an anime sociologist to offer examples, but our cultures value different things. Of course, we are all on the same cosmic boat and have many similarities, too. Hero myth, love, compassion, will be enjoyed by both. Plus, we must both like animated video.

    Here's the tough one: why would certain series do better in one market (the Samurai Champloo question)? I think the West tends to glorify certain Japanese cultural artifacts. The "Kill Bill" movies capitolized on this fascination of things Japanese, and did well in spite of shoddy film making (...sorry...). While Japan may not be tired of samurai, the presentation may be the important factor. If samurai aren't presented in the context that the Japanese typically think of them in, the series may not be popular. Contrastingly, if a tough guy (or better: girl) weilds an indestructible blade exhibiting no loyalty but mucho "honor" for the sake of revenge, I'd say you have a hit US based anime.

    Anyone know how Ruroni Kenshin did when aired in Japan?

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    Newbie silversurfie may be famous one day silversurfie may be famous one day silversurfie's Avatar
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    Re: Differences in Anime Fandom inside/outside of Japan

    I can personally attest to how most Americans who havent grown up watching another culture's anime/movies. Ill use Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon for example. Look how America has fallen in love with it. It won a bizillion academy awards and named the biggest hit of the year, etc etc. But when you go and talk to the Chinese people that have watched those types of movies all their lives it was a little bit above average, but not the best thing. The same can be said of Samurai Champloo, the americans might think its great but to us hardcore anime and japanese people its like blah what else is new?

  3. #19
    Grouchy Old Anime Otaku LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata's Avatar
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    Re: Differences in Anime Fandom inside/outside of Japan

    Grumble Grumble Grumble

    I feel that part of the difference is the way that Anime was introduced to the US market back in the early 1990s. In the early 90s, most of the anime series that were available were either Hentai series, dark moody gore series (Ninja Scrol, Devil Hunger Yohko, etc) and children anime series (Dragon Ball Z, Digimon, Monster Rancher). The few serious anime series that were brought over (Space Battleship Yamato, Macross) were flawed with a non-serious english dub (Star Blazers, RoboTech). Most of the serious prime time anime series were ignored as either too 'Japanese' for an american audiance (Tenchi Muyo), or too expansive too license (Nadia). As a result, most of the US anime fandom think that moody gore series (Berserk, Hellsing, Samurai Champloo, Peacemaker, Elfin Lied, Gantz, etc.) and fanservice intense series (Chobits, Mahoromatic, DNAngle, Excel Saga, Girls Bravo, etc) are the 'norm', when in fact they represent only a limited market (usually aired in the post-midnight time slots) targeted for the extreme fringe otaku fans.

    It's only recently (from the late 1990s) that the 'Prime Time' anime series (Full Metal Alchemist, Gundam Seed) have been coming over to the US market, though some Japanese Prime Time series (Tokyo Mew Mew, One Piece, Cardcaptor Sakura) are still plagued with a childrens program english dub.
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  4. #20
    Otaku tekem may be famous one day tekem may be famous one day tekem's Avatar
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    Re: Differences in Anime Fandom inside/outside of Japan

    it could be due how each nation prefers to promote society
    Here in the U.S. we promote individuality everybody wants to
    be different, still accepted by everyone else, but just
    want to be unique

    I've never been anywhere close to Japan but i always thought
    they kind of promoted uniformity- if you want to be successful
    then u gotta act and do like they do

    maybe thats why characters who were unique in their own series
    weren't liked as much as they are here (Mugen - a cocky know
    it all who does things like know one else in his era, and Spike - pretty much
    the same)

    I could be totally wrong though, its just a theory,
    just trying to get into your guys' conversation ^^

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