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Thread: Home networking woes

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    Otaku vb0xn4rd may be famous one day vb0xn4rd may be famous one day
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    Home networking woes

    Well, I just got a sweet new laptop (2.4ghz, 1gb RAM, 64mb graphics), and I'm trying to get it networked ethernet-style with my old lag beast (1ghz, 256mb RAM, 16mb graphics), but with no luck. I think my my main problem is that I'm using a switch rather than a router, so the IP addresses aren't getting set right. Plus, when I do the setup for microsoft home networking, it tells me i have to have an active internet connection, which will further mess with my IP address settings... I'm using XP Pro, btw. I have a feeling this would be a peice of cake if I had 2000...

    So, does someone have a suggestion that won't cost me any money? 'Cause at this point, I'm thinking of getting a wireless router and card for the lag beast, but that would take funding which I'm short of right now.

    Grr, I'm so close to being A+ certified, I should know how to fix this myself. But, I had an accident this weekend that broke some bones in my face, and I'm on some very strong pain meds for it, so mebbe I'm not thinking 100% right now...

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    Lost in the ethernet dragonrider2004 may be famous one day dragonrider2004 may be famous one day dragonrider2004's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vb0xn4rd
    Well, I just got a sweet new laptop (2.4ghz, 1gb RAM, 64mb graphics), and I'm trying to get it networked ethernet-style with my old lag beast (1ghz, 256mb RAM, 16mb graphics), but with no luck. I think my my main problem is that I'm using a switch rather than a router, so the IP addresses aren't getting set right. Plus, when I do the setup for microsoft home networking, it tells me i have to have an active internet connection, which will further mess with my IP address settings... I'm using XP Pro, btw. I have a feeling this would be a peice of cake if I had 2000...

    So, does someone have a suggestion that won't cost me any money? 'Cause at this point, I'm thinking of getting a wireless router and card for the lag beast, but that would take funding which I'm short of right now.

    Grr, I'm so close to being A+ certified, I should know how to fix this myself. But, I had an accident this weekend that broke some bones in my face, and I'm on some very strong pain meds for it, so mebbe I'm not thinking 100% right now...
    dude, sounds like you are trying to do DHCP IP assigning when you have no DHCP server. assign the IP's statically and you'll be all set!

    Student: "Umm sensei, the question on the board is wrong."
    Teacher "SHAAAADD UP!"

  3. #3
    Otaku vb0xn4rd may be famous one day vb0xn4rd may be famous one day
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    Okay, but if I assign the IPs myself, how will I get on the net? (I use a cable modem and the cable co assigns me a single static IP)

    Also, where do I go in XP to set up a workgroup?

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    Otaku maverickvns may be famous one day maverickvns may be famous one day
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    if you want to be able to have both comps get on the net without a router, do this http://www.annoyances.org/exec/show/ics_xp

    otherwise, get yourself a router. if you still want to input ip addresses manually with the router, make sure you assign the gateway ip address as the same as your router's ip address.

    if you want to set up a workgroup, go to my coumputer properties under computer name tab, click on change.

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    Otaku vb0xn4rd may be famous one day vb0xn4rd may be famous one day
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    Well, I don't have the right equipment for ICS, so I prolly will throw down some cash on a wireless router in a couple weeks...

    Which brings up another questions: Should I go for b, g, or a combo router (b/g)? I want whatever gives me the most range and a connection speed that will give me my full 6mbit cable bandwidth. Cost is also a bit of an issue, but if one is cheaper than the other but sacrifices too much quality, I'm willing to go a step up.

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    Grouchy Old Anime Otaku LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata has become well known LenMiyata's Avatar
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    Grumble Grumble Grumble

    If your worried about someone eavesdropping on your connections, the encryption protocols of IEEE 802.11b are broken by design. Otherwise, if security is not an issue, it really doesn't matter...

    802.11g has fixed the crypto problems, and has faster throughput, but both 802.11b and 802.11g have greater bandwidth then your 6mbit/sec cable connection, so this is not an issue...

    Overview article on the IEEE 802.11 standards...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11
    FAVOURITE THREADS EXPLAIN why, or risk an infraction.
    Rantings of a Grouchy Old Anime Otaku

  7. #7
    Otaku maverickvns may be famous one day maverickvns may be famous one day
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    b and g both have the same range. the rule here is that the wireless connection will always decrease its speed to the device with the lowest possible bandwith. therefore, having a G router, and a B card will be running at B speed. even if you have another G card connected and a B card connected somewhere else, the router will drop its speed to B level. Therefore, if you're going G, you might as well go G everything if you want all that 54mbps bandwith. But as stated before, B/G has more than enough bandwith, so it's up to you and how you want it.

    Having more than one wireless device connected to router also splits a certain amount of bandwith allotted to each device, so be weary of how many wireless devices are connected and how constant are they needing the bandwith. Line connected devices are not affected, obviously.

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    Otaku vb0xn4rd may be famous one day vb0xn4rd may be famous one day
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    Well, I ponied up the money, and went with a Linksys Wireless-G router, w/ a Wireless-G PCI card for my desktop. After a few hiccups, it seems to be working fine on the laptop, but the desktop is having issues. It keeps disconnecting, but reconnects without thinking it's reconnected (i.e. the icon says disconnected, but I'm still on the Web and can still see it on the network from my laptop...). It's good when it's quasi-connected, or whatever you want to call it, but it still disconnects again at random... I've tried restarting, which only helps until it disconnects at random again, and I've tried the "repair" option, which again only helps partially. Any thoughts?

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