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Thread: How To Create An AMV!

  1. #1
    Newbie Yukino_AE may be famous one day Yukino_AE may be famous one day
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    Talking How To Create An AMV!

    I thought I would post this so that everyone here who wants to know will know. I've helped a few people out with this explination over the past couple days and thought it would be good to post it.

    ^_^


    Now the easiest way you can make an AMV is to crop clips from a different AMV. You can find tons of amv's to do this with on www.animemusicvideos.org

    All you would have to do is download amv's that you want clips from and upload them into Windows Movie Maker. That's really simple. The only thing with that is you don't always find the right clips or you don't get nice quality images or ones with subtitles. Some subtitles are ok as long as they match the music and the scene that's going on.

    So to do that you only need a program like Windows Movie Maker.

    Now. If you want to have high quality clips on your AMV and you have a dvd you want to pull the clips from, that's a different story and takes a bit more of a process.

    First of all you need to have a dvd drive on your computer. Now in order to rip clips from your dvd there's several steps and you will need a couple programs.

    The programs you will need or at least the ones i suggest and use are:

    ImTOO DVD Ripper, WinAvi or I use Xilisoft Video Converter, and you will need Windows Movie Maker.

    The reason that you need those first to programs is this.

    When you rip chapters from your dvd you have to convert them to MPEG2 format. That's where ImTOO comes in, it will convert your dvd format to MPEG2. you'll see that with this program there's options for it to go straight to MPEG or AVI but you don't want that because you're video will turn out all grainy and not as good. So convert it to MPEG2. I suggest doing this only a couple chapters at a time.

    Once this is done you would use either the Winavi or the Xilisoft program to convert your MPEG2 to either AVI or WMV format. The reason for the conversion is that Windows Movie Maker Cannot Read an MPEG2 file so you wouldn't be able to upload it into WMM without converting it first.

    After that final conversion from MPEG2 to AVI or WMV load your file into Windows Movie Maker and you should be good to go. You just need to get the right music. ^-^

    I hope that helps! If anyone has more questions just message me! if you download either Xilisoft or ImTOO and you need the serial number you can message me for that also and i'll hook you up.
    Last edited by Yukino_AE; Jul 21, 2005 at 12:41 PM.

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    Newbie fact3 may be famous one day fact3 may be famous one day
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    Re: How To Create An AMV!

    wow,thanks this post really solve the puzzle in my head about the softwares u all use,
    how about synchronizing,did the softwares did it hav to do it ourself??

  3. #3
    Newbie JEEB may be famous one day JEEB may be famous one day JEEB's Avatar
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    Re: How To Create An AMV!

    ::DISCLAIMER::

    Anyone can use the programs they want to use, I'm not saying my way is the only way - I'm just saying that TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE there are programs that do the same job better than the ones another person had said. Of course, usually same codecs are used, but the encoding programs do have their good and bad points on the usability. I'm giving the advices that, AS FAR AS I KNOW, give you the best result after gathering data from various video encoding- related websites. You can usually check the software used to encode a video by checking its metadata - and usually you'll find a footmark of one of the apps I mentioned [Virtual/NanDub].

    ::/DISCLAIMER::

    Oh my god...

    Yukino_AE, did you know that DVDs have their video data stored as MPEG-2 and that rippers usually just copy the chapter files (and decrypt them as well, usually, by DeCSS) to a folder (or to an image file)? So no "conversion" takes place. And then I'd just say that people should stay away from closed formats like WMV (which, AFAIK, can only be encoded in Windows). If there's no other choice, use the .avi container format (although I prefer Matroska) and encode the video in XVid - or even better - x264 (which is still under heavy developement, on the other hand) and the audio as OGG Vorbis (better quality) or MP3. That way the encoding and decoding can be done on any system, since all the parts are open-source. And why not rip the DVD's video part wholly as usually the ripper saves the original file structure? Don't see any reason for that, other than saving space.

    The cutting and pasting can be done in many ways and in the program of preference, even with AviSynth (text scripts) if you want, since usually people use a different program to encode the video, like VirtualDub (VirtualDubMod hasn't been updated for a while, I wonder...) or NanDub, which make the process easy and are 100% open-source. And they all open MPEG-2 files (if you have a decoder, which you usually have). As for ripping software, AFAIK the DVDDecrypter software is preferred for DVD ripping.

    So my guide for the process is [the programs I'd use are listed after the advice]:
    1. Get your source video and audio (rip a CD to WAV [or the format of preference if you know it already], decrypt and rip a DVD) -- DVDDecrypter for the DVD and the CD ripper of your choice for the CD track(s)
    2. Do the editing (== make the AMV), save as "uncompressed RGB" (or something like that) -- You can do it in VirtualDub (but it's a bit bulky, I know - since it's usually used for the encoding part) or AviSynth (with which you can preview faster and not have to save between edits [only the AviSynth script file has to be saved] - although it's really bulky and requires you to know the points of cutting)
    3. Encode in a format your audience would prefer it to be seen (most openable would propably be the .avi container with Xvid video and MP3 audio) -- I'd use VirtualDub
    4. Do what you want with your video -- (^_^)
    Fact3, whatever software you are using, you'll have to do the synchronization by yourself. That's the editing part, which is - by the way - the hardest and most time-taking of them all. And using WMM might be popular somewhere, but I'd stay as far as I could from it. Although it is easy to use, It'll cut off any POSIX- compatible O/S users (like all the Linux users out there) off and it'll not let you save in any format you want (as far as I remember). You can study with it, but you should switch to more "professional" tools as soon as possible.

    And, Yukino_AE, as far as I can see by the end of your post, at least some of those programs are surely not free (which is not usually preferred within MPEG-4- encoders, because the quality of the cheap ones is worse than the open-source ones' [pro tools are very expensive so they aren't usually used for AMVs, or any other type of video that is not going to be sold]) as they require a registration - which cannot usually be obtained by any other way than warez'ing if you won't pay for it (that 'hooking up' just seems too much like 'I'll just generate you a key with a keygen' or 'I'll just check a site that has keys on it and give you one of them' - which can be considered as warez'ing as long as you don't show us you really paid for them). And such warez'ing isn't preferred within people that are into video encoding - that's something I know for sure.

    All the apps I mentioned and a lot of information on video conversion/encoding can be found on Doom9.org (clickie). And I recommend the Gordian Knot rippack and codec packs found on the page for the beginner - they usually have anything you need to make AMVs (like BeSweet for the audio encoding and the *Dub programs plus AviSynth for video editing and encoding) and give you a good base to install other software for the editing part.
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    Newbie Yukino_AE may be famous one day Yukino_AE may be famous one day
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    Re: How To Create An AMV!

    Ok. The way i described is very simple. And I offered it as a way of helping people because many people were asking me how i made my OWN amv's. So don't get all up on my case about it, i was just trying to help. damn.

    and some of the programs i use are free and some are not. and the ones that are not aren't expensive mr. know it all. $20.

    as a side not i personally like wmv because it creates a smaller saved file than avi or the others, which makes it ALOT easier on space.

    i would post more but it's late and i'm tired. so maybe next time i won't post any help topics and mr. not good enough unless he's slamming someone's way of offering simple help, over here can take it upon himself to do it.
    Last edited by Yukino_AE; Aug 01, 2005 at 01:27 AM.

  5. #5
    Newbie amjl81 may be famous one day amjl81 may be famous one day amjl81's Avatar
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    Re: How To Create An AMV!

    How I get clips for my AMVs (although I have yet to actually complete one, just started one today) is I download anime episodes from LimeWire that are AVI and I can import them into Windows Movie Maker and shrink them down. I can also do what you said about downloading the different AMVs from animemusicvideos.org
    What I found is best is using the AMVs because then they don't have subtitles, unlike the ones I got from LimeWire.

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    Newbie JEEB may be famous one day JEEB may be famous one day JEEB's Avatar
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    Re: How To Create An AMV!

    Ok, Yukino_AE - my intention was not to get personal with you on anything, although I must say my text was close to insulting - or at least to "pointing fingers". Therefore I apologize, since I think I made my point a bit too much personally. This is a sincere apology, since I usually do not tend to get boiled-up on anything.

    And then onto the subject:

    When encoding to WMV, what bitrates do you usually use? Like, name your most-used resolution with the framerate and say a bitrate. I know that usually the videos are indeed encoded with a variable bitrate, but there's always the bitrate it's set to (the middle one). I would like to know since usually XVid- encoded video beats WMV, as for the image quality is concerned, at the same filesize (as proved by the encoding comparison done by Doom9 [clickie]).

    You should try saving your work as the .avi option provided by WMM (only now do I get it's something close to either uncompressed video or one of the earliest Microsoft's video codecs [the Indeo one?] - haven't looked at WMM in a while) and open it in VirtualDub - for example. Then select the codec you wish to use (XVid, DivX or something else) and start playing with the settings (you can also read guides about bitrates at Doom9). The result should be a file that's as big as the one encoded with the WMV codec but better in quality. Remember that when saving short, low-res clips the audio takes more size when compared to the overall size of the video data. That's where you'll have to decide whether or not you need HQ audio with a 320x240@30fps clip saved with a bitrate around 500kbps. Some playing around to set the audio encoder to variable bitrate and a wise selection of codecs should overcome such small questions.

    As an example, I usually use XVid (Build 1.03) set to somewhere close to 640x480@30fps and get very good image quality on bitrates around 1200-1300kbits/sec resulting in a 1min file to be around 10 megabytes, which is quite good for home use or internet releases. Of course different clips compress differently, but these are some of the figures I use. Not for DVD rips though, there I'll have to drop the resolution and the bitrate a bit (which is OK since the DVD resolution will be scaled down because of various circuimstances [there's almost no progressive image on DVDs]).

    Then there's x264, which clearly rules at bitrates less than 1000kbits/sec, especially at around or less than 500kbits/sec. But on the other hand I don't know if there's a DirectShow filter for it yet, which would make its use much easier than now (it's in the MPlayer CVS's MEncoder, but it's not of the easiest to use for beginners). But that codec is still in its "baby stage" - kinda reminds me of the early days of XVid developement (^_^).

    And then, indeed, WMM is easy to use and comes with Windowses all the way from WinME - making it good for beginners. Then it can save the video in a format that any player/encoder program can open (the AVI- option it has), which seems to be the uncompressed format (the best to use while editing and to provide the final video for the encoder, while it sure takes its space on the HD - about 800 megs for a 3 min 42 sec clip). But the fact is, .avi is a container and WMV is a codec with its own container. So there can possibly be anything inside a .avi file (and, .wmv - too, by the way) - everything from that huge "uncompressed" video to tight-packing video formats like x264 or the most-used codec - XVid. The WMM doesn't really divide these facts (since it gives you no control on what codec is used to encode the video to the .avi container), which leads many people to think AVI is a video compression system, while it really is just a type of a "box" into which video data is put. So basically I have nothing against using WMM in the effort of studying video editing/making clips, but have some things to comment on the final encoding side of things.

    And I won't start talking to you about the prices, I'm happy with the $0 software I use now (^_^). Actually try DVDDecrypter for the DVD ripping and VirtualDub for the video saving using the "uncompressed" format. You could be surprised that they might offer you more options than those tools you use. But I think there's no big difference in DVD rippers, so it's just a matter of taste for every user, something that really doesn't matter for the end result.

    Lastly, I might have given you the image I wanted to somehow "put down" your guide, but that's not the case. If you look thoroughly into the facts I have provided in my earlier post, you'll see that they're actually more of like recommendations or offerings of ideas to your original guide. Like the use of WMM for final encoding and stuff like that.

    I think that some newbies that start out with video editing/AMV making might be completely happy with your guide, but I'd rather let them study a bit more, get into the details - and therefore, get better quality on lesser space taken when they'll master their technique. I'll apologize one more time for making it unclear to you that I have nothing against your guide. I just wanted to help with the facts I know.

    Amjl81 - try downloading raw clips of animes that aren't yet licensed and buy the DVDs of those that are already out licensed - those'll give you a plenty of high-quality raw material (without subtitles) that you can use to make AMVs. Not all AMV makers like that you use their materials (^_^). And you can't really make the resolution bigger after you've gotten low-res "originals".
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