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Thread: Should schools teach religion?

  1. #81
    M A S T E R Zui Quan may be famous one day Zui Quan may be famous one day Zui Quan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 100%
    What do you mean by 3 MAIN religions ?
    What are the 3 MAIN religions you are referring to ?

    You are insulting other cultures ! Not only you know BS. It is not right. No religion is better then others.
    He's referring to the 3 main monotheistic religions of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. The other monotheistic religions out there, such as Zoroasterism, have in insignificant number of followers in comparison to the "Big 3."
    Last edited by Zui Quan; Jun 04, 2005 at 09:10 PM.
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  2. #82
    Banned ??? may be famous one day ??? may be famous one day
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    What about Buddhists, Shinto, Hindus, Jews, Muslims ?
    Should they be forgiven just because they are not in the BIG 3 ?
    Why would you call BIG 3 ? And not Big 100 ?

    Samething with languages:

    1 - Chinese, Mandarin
    2 - Spanish
    3 - English

    Would you call the rest are not important ?

  3. #83
    M A S T E R Zui Quan may be famous one day Zui Quan may be famous one day Zui Quan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ???
    What about Buddhists, Shinto, Hindus, Jews, Muslims ?
    Should they be forgiven just because they are not in the BIG 3 ?
    Why would you call BIG 3 ? And not Big 100 ?

    Samething with languages:

    1 - Chinese, Mandarin
    2 - Spanish
    3 - English

    Would you call the rest are not important ?


    Jews belong to Judaism, Muslims belong to Islam. Judaism and Islam are the names of the faiths. Jews and Muslims describes the people that are adherents to those faiths, respectively.


    Buddhists, Shintoists, and Hindus are POLYTHEISTS (multiple gods/spirits). They don't enter in to the equation when talking about the three major MONOTHEISTIC (single god) faiths.



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    By the way, since you claim the ??? account belongs to your cousin, I'm going to ban the account and you can start a new one or use the "100%" account that you started tonight. That will alleviate any more confusion that might occur when people check the ??? user profile.
    Last edited by Zui Quan; Jun 04, 2005 at 09:42 PM.
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  4. #84
    Domme Kasai may be famous one day Kasai may be famous one day Kasai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zui Quan
    Jews belong to Judaism, Muslims belong to Islam. Judaism and Islam are the names of the faiths. Jews and Muslims describes the people that are adherents to those faiths, respectively.


    Buddhists, Shintoists, and Hindus are POLYTHEISTS (multiple gods/spirits). They don't enter in to the equation when talking about the three major MONOTHEISTIC (single god) faiths.


    Aye. But no they shouldnt teach it in schools.
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  5. #85
    AO Angel ^^ angelan may be famous one day angelan may be famous one day angelan's Avatar
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    I'm breaking my word in saying that i won't post here again, but i came across something that people might find interesting:

    Quote Originally Posted by Patricia Bow - University of Waterloo Daily Bulletin Article
    Students value spirituality, course finds

    Religion and spirituality are deeply important to students of all backgrounds, but often they find it hard to develop these aspects of themselves at university. That's one of the findings in a recent study conducted by Diana Denton, drama and speech communication professor, and funded by UW and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. She also established that specific skills can be taught to help people learn about and appreciate each other's faith differences.
    Denton is based in the Canadian Centre of Arts and Technology in the faculty of arts, and is also a member of the Forge Institute, a United States-based non-profit organization concerned with "trans-traditional spirituality," encouraging spiritual development, and promoting dialogue between people of different religious backgrounds. She is co-editor of Holistic Learning and Spirituality in Education (2005) and Spirituality, Action and Pedagogy: Teaching From the Heart (2004).

    The study attempted to establish how students' spiritual development can be fostered through the curriculum. Instead of textbook-and-lecture format, Denton explored an experiential approach, with students and instructor participating together.

    In fall and winter 2003-04, she conducted 10 two-hour workshops with nine volunteers: undergraduate and graduate students from psychology, drama, and speech communication. They came from Baptist, Mennonite, Catholic, Native, Muslim, and non-denominational backgrounds. The sessions were videotaped in the CCAT lab in the Modern Languages building. Each session included meditation, writing in journals, pairing off to share thoughts and perceptions, and group discussion of everything from "the Eucharist to Drumming Circles and Vision Quests, to reflections on our own inner experience." Following the workshop series, Denton interviewed participants separately.

    The study demonstrated that "students are hungry for safe places where they can talk about their beliefs," including their doubts. Often they fail to find such safe places among their peers, where fear of ridicule keeps many silent, or in their own families or religious institutions.

    Denton also found that certain practices helped students to be more open to each others' approaches to spirituality, without abandoning their own. Ground rules that required confidentiality and a non-judgmental attitude established a sense of trust. Comparing experiences of meditation showed students how often they stood on common ground. They also found useful the practice of "deep listening," where two students would listen silently while a third spoke, saving questions and discussion for later. The participants reported that a strong sense of community developed in the group.

    A senior seminar course spun off from the workshops. Spiritual Development in a Diverse Society: Communicating Across Differences was offered as a speech communication course in fall 2004 and will be offered again next winter. Denton has also held five-day workshops at various locations in Canada and the United States for educators interested in teaching the course. The next session takes place at the University of Michigan June 27 to July 1.

    "Since 9/11 there has been much more awareness of the importance religion plays in people's lives -- that it can be so divisive," Denton says. "We need to work with the young, to help them learn how to cope with this conflict and how to be leaders in a diverse society."
    I will put the hard link to the Bulletin page if people want tomorrow (when the hard link appears)

    interesting points brought up....but i still see the problem of parents not wanting their kids to participate or kids themselves not wanting to participate.
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  6. #86
    Otaku Wonderlandless may be famous one day Wonderlandless may be famous one day Wonderlandless's Avatar
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    I think Religion should be taught, but the teacher shouldn't say "This religion is wrong" or "this religion is better than this one". The problem with our world is there isn't enough tolerance and too much ignorance. If religion is taught we'd come to understand not every Muslim believes they will go to Heaven if they kill Americans or that Christians are crazy people who fear everyone but those of their own religion...and Catholics don't all molest little boys.

    These are sterotypes that I think with teaching we can overcome.
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  7. #87
    Newbie Neuroport may be famous one day Neuroport may be famous one day Neuroport's Avatar
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    Religion should be taught in the form of a World Religions or Theology course, not as doctrine.
    "Impartiality is a pompous name for indifference, which is an elegant name for ignorance." -- G. K. Chesterton
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  8. #88
    Newbie virginkid may be famous one day virginkid may be famous one day virginkid's Avatar
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    I've been in a catholic school almost all my life so I would say Yes! Religion definitely gives students something to look to during their tough school lives; as well as grooms them to be "wholesome" (sounding like a teacher here ^^;; )

    Seriously, I think people cope better in a religious environment. Of course it doesn't help if you send someone with no former interaction with religion to a catholic school but from a personal PoV, cathocism has definitely helped me.

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