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Thread: Vectoring

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    Domme Kasai may be famous one day Kasai may be famous one day Kasai's Avatar
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    Vectoring

    I need some help in vectoring. I've looked at a few tuts but none were too specific.

    If you have any tips or tuts..Please, share?
    Seduced by Flesh


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    Otaku know1 may be famous one day know1 may be famous one day know1's Avatar
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    Re: Vectoring

    I would be glad to help, but you need to narrow your question down a bit. I assume you're talking about vector graphics.

    The advantages of vector over raster graphics are the smaller file sizes, the scalability of the image (you can zoom in all you want, and the image will not pixelate), and the crisp edges on curves and complicated lines. The disadvantage is that it is usually harder to produce vector graphics that are photorealistic, as they tend to require more work to produce high detail.

    For conversion, Flash can trace raster images (with varying results) that can be displayed as vector, although there are probably cheaper and more specific programs that will do the same job. Adobe illustrator works with vector graphics, for creating from scratch.

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    Domme Kasai may be famous one day Kasai may be famous one day Kasai's Avatar
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    Re: Vectoring

    Hmmm...I'm trying to vector an image. I believe the second paragraph helped most. Thnx.
    Seduced by Flesh


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    Newbie obliteration may be famous one day obliteration may be famous one day obliteration's Avatar
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    Re: Vectoring

    I'm afraid I don't have much to offer that can't be found in your typical path basics tutorial. Of all the tutorials floating around on the net, Shinta's pen tool tutorial works well for beginners. From there, it's pretty simple to develop the other skills on your own, but there are two mistakes commonly made that I should warn you of:

    1. If you plan on making a true vector, don't use path strokes, as they're always raster-based. Increasing image size will always result in pixelation if you use path strokes for the outlines. Of course, you can always mask it by using a larger brush stroke in order to keep the stroke proportional to the image, but the problem remains. It's best to substitute it with thoughtful layer ordering. In other words, create new shapes for outlines, then put whatever you want on top - or under, whichever suits you best in the situation at hand.

    To better illustrate this, I'll post a few screenshots recording the method from my last vector.







    As seen in the images, it's merely a process of putting one shape atop another. Simple, yes?

    (And yes, it is more tedious, but it pays off in the end, trust me. Plus, it allows line dynamics. )

    2. This one isn't really much of a problem, per se, as much as it is a hassle. This one's simple: Strive to use vector shapes at all times. With basic paths, resizing will usually result in pixelation, much like the un-|337 path stroke. Of course, simply filling the path with whatever color you were using will fix that, but it can be terribly tedious when working with multiple layers. I can personally testify to that one; going over every layer again and refilling its respective path can take forever. Instead, when you select the pen tool, make sure you look to the upper left hand corner and check to see if the first option of those three boxes (one with a box showing anchor points, one with the said box and the pen tool image overlayed, and a third one that is a box without any anchor points... it should look something like this (click)) is selected. Doing this can save you from wasting a good deal of time and frustration.

    Oh, and in a recent conversation with a paster at a local church, I was told that exporting your paths to Adobe Illustrator for the final product ends up making your work look prettier, but I can't say if there's any truth in that. From my experience with the program, Illustrator scares me stupid, and I therefore don't dare try until I've become acquainted with the program. If you have the opportunity, however, I encourage you to try it sometime.

    Anyways, good luck.
    Last edited by obliteration; Sep 10, 2005 at 03:05 AM.

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