+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 13 ... LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 108

Thread: Should weed be sold in stores

  1. #17
    Mathematical!! Bugz Champion, Ant Bully Champion, Chainsaw the childern Champion, 3D Net Blazer Champion, Cricket Challenge Champion, Big Uglies Champion, Body Check Champion, Desktop Fishing Champion, All Star Skate Park Champion, Chuckie Egg Champion, Birdy Champion, Anthrax Jelly Champion, Air Typer Champion, Word Pads Champion, Crash Test Dummy Curling Champion, The Mini Jump Game Champion, Chairlift Challenge Champion, Astroboy vs One Bad Storm Champion, Fight Man Champion, Blot In Hell Champion, Beeku Adventure Champion, Connect2 Champion, Atomica Champion, Cannonball Follies 2 Champion, Bada Boing Champion, BeachDefence Champion, Alkie Kong 2 Champion atomik_sprout has become well known atomik_sprout has become well known atomik_sprout has become well known atomik_sprout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    2,643
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 166 Times in 141 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    Quote Originally Posted by _gwenibe_ View Post
    I don't think any one can say that alcohol is twenty times worse than weed. Considering everyone reacts to weed differently and I have heard and seen people who have been nagtively effected by weed, and one did get aggressive.

    and Miroku is right, it impairs your ability. And there have been people killed because some idiot was high and driving, I think there was a case here were a young girl was run over because of one.

    I could never understand how weed was illegal yet, tabaco smoking and alcohol aren't - they are all drugs and they are have bad effects. We don't need another drug made legal. For every one person that uses the drug 'appropiatly' (if you even can). There are two idiots doing something stupid to themselves or some one else.
    Well, maybe this country is just full of idiots. In Amsterdam, there are no marijuana related fatalities. Also, I highly believe that weed would impair someone's ability to drive. I've smokes a half-ounce of weed between Minnesota and Wisconsin, while driving. Never crashed high, never ran someone over, never done anything to get pulled over. The only time I've been in an accident or gotten pulled over is when I'm not smokin' weed.

    And I still fail to see actual PROOF of someone being killed by a "pot driver". If someone's desicions and ability to make good judgments are affected by marijuana, it's likely they're either retarded or on other drugs/alchohol. Trust me, I know. I've seen every drug in the book--save a couple (crack/needles). And I'm not proud of that fact either, but my point is that there is no way in hell that marijuana should be illegal when there are TWO legal "drugs" that are much, much worse.

    You find me one weed related car accident/killing/death--WITH PROOF--and I'll drop my argument! But until I see said proof, I'll stand my ground. I'm a member of NORML--the National Orginization for Reformation of Marijuana Laws--I've given speeches on this subject. I can go on and on forever! You bring me proof and I'll eat my hat.


  2. #18
    Commander Ham Chiefblackhammer is making a name for themselves Chiefblackhammer is making a name for themselves Chiefblackhammer is making a name for themselves Chiefblackhammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Winston Salem, NC
    Posts
    1,887
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 84 Times in 68 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    Quote Originally Posted by atomik_sprout View Post
    I find your argument lacking any good point...

    LIKE I STATED EARLIER... Nobody has ever killed anyone from being "too high", only too drunk. Screw what the commercials and those "high on lifers" say! Where's the official proof?? There isn't any. Any drug will do that to drivers as well as alchohol, but marijuana is not a drug, it is a plant with TONS of positive purposes for mankind, other than getting high.

    You can make paper, clothing, OIL, inks and dyes, ANYTHING from this plant! I've never had a sudden change of behavior from smokin' weed. I've never gotten "too high", I've never lashed out on someone while I'd been smoking, but I can guarantee you that if I'm drunk, I will. Alchohol is TWENTY times worse than what marijuana will ever be.

    Alcohol is also much more abundantly available, consumed much more and all because it is legal to use. Legalize weed and you will see a large spike in the deaths by it.

    Weed like anything that can inhibit your ability to function, can and does become dangerous and deadly ANYTIME it is used and especially if you are operating a motor vehicle which requires focus. You make the claim that the "weed" doesn't affect you yet hundreds of actual scientific studies say differently, the funny thing is your claim sounds familiar… much like those drunk people who operate vehicles…I mean you think a drunken person "thinks" they are drunk or impaired? Most certainly not "too drunk" to drive...yet drunk driving kills thousands each year. Weed would be no different if taken and then motor vehicle operation occurred.

    Here is real information on the drug.

    Drugs and Human Performance FACT SHEETS - Cannabis / Marijuana ( D 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol, THC)

    Let me point out this part in particular:
    Panel’s Assessment of Driving Risks: Low doses of THC moderately impair cognitive and psychomotor tasks associated with driving, while severe driving impairment is observed with high doses, chronic use and in combination with low doses of alcohol, the more difficult and unpredictable the task, the more likely marijuana will impair performance.
    Here are the test studies to back up the above quote:
    CANNABIS

    Laboratory Studies

    Moskowitz (1984) conducted multiple studies on the separate and joint effects of alcohol and different drugs on divided attention. He found two differences in attention that distinguished between alcohol and smoked marijuana (with 50, 100, and 200 g/kg): (1) marijuana impaired peripheral detection of lights under both the focused and divided attention conditions, while alcohol did not, and (2) alcohol increased fixation durations in simulated driving while marijuana did not.

    Perez-Reyes, Hicks, Bumberry, et al. (1988) gave six healthy moderate male users combinations of alcohol (placebo, 0.42 g/kg, and 0.85 g/kg) and marijuana cigarettes (with 0 or 2.4% THC). They measured accuracy and latency of performance in their "Simulator Evaluation of Drug Impairment" and found that marijuana increased alcohol-related impairments in a synergistic manner. They also found that marijuana accelerated heart rate.

    Heishman, Stitzer, and Bigelow (1988) in a within-subject design, gave each of 6 male volunteers with mean age 26 years old one alcohol + marijuana dose on each of six counterbalanced sessions. Alcohol doses were .00, .07 or .13 BAC, and the marijuana cigarettes had 0, 1.3, or 2.7% THC. Marijuana produced only minimal decrement in the digit symbol substitution test, while alcohol impaired performance on all three cognitive measures used: simple reaction time to circular lights, digit symbol substitution test, and pursuit tracking on a choice reaction time. Heart rate increased in a dose-related manner in response to marijuana, but not in response to alcohol.

    In a second study with marijuana only, Heishman, Stitzer, and Yingling (1989) gave 12 male users of marijuana cigarettes doses of 0, 1.3, or 2.7% THC, in a within-subject design, in 3 experimental sessions separated by 48 hours. As before, they found that subjects' feelings of a "high" and heart rate increased in a dose-related manner. More important, performance on short-term memory tasks as measured on forward and reverse attention span was impaired, and for the high dose condition, only performance was also impaired on the digit symbol substitution test. However, unlike the Moskowitz 1984 study, they did not find any impairments in a divided attention task.

    Heishman, Huestis, Henningfield, and Cone (1990) evaluated marijuana effects on three regular users, using 0, 2.6%, and 5.1% THC, in a within-subject design. They obtained a subjective "high" for all subjects and a slight impairment in serial reaction time task (where subjects had to respond to a series of lights that appeared randomly, within a circle of 16 bulbs, and the score was the number of lights responded to in one minute). For two out of the three subjects, they also obtained impairments in digit recall and serial addition/subtraction. No significant impairments were found a day after smoking the marijuana. Performance in a visual search task (two-letter cancellation task) and logical reasoning were not affected by marijuana in a consistent manner.

    Chait and Perry (1994) studied the effects of marijuana (0 or 3.6% THC) alone or in combination with alcohol (.00 or .09 BAC), in a within-subject design, on 10 male and 4 female volunteers with a mean age of 25 years. They used both subjective measures of mood and objective measures of performance to observe both immediate effects and day-after effects. The visual analogue measures of feeling high and feeling drunk were very similar in magnitude for the marijuana alone and alcohol alone conditions, suggesting that they were able to match the level of perceived intoxication of the two drugs. Significant performance impairments due to marijuana were obtained only for time production (of 30, 60, and 120 seconds intervals). Alcohol resulted in overproduction (with subjects producing longer intervals), while marijuana caused underproduction. Performance on digit symbol substitution test, one-leg-stand, backward digit span, and free recall were impaired by alcohol only, and logical reasoning and divided attention were not impaired by either marijuana or alcohol. When impairment was demonstrated, it was only immediately following drug ingestion, with very little residual effects on the following day.

    Heishman, Arasteh, and Stitzer (1997) evaluated the effects of placebo, three levels of alcohol (.025, .05, and .10 BAC), and three levels of marijuana (4, 8, or 16 puffs of marijuana cigarettes with 3.55% THC, yielding an average of 63, 150, and 188 ng/ml plasma THC) on five male, 18-26 years old volunteers. The order of the seven doses was random across subjects, and sessions were separated by one week. Subjective ratings on 12 perceived effects were made on visual analogue scales. Performance tests included simple reaction time, digit symbol substitution test for 90 seconds, number recognition test based on Sternberg test with variable memory set of seven digits, time estimation for durations of 5, 20, and 80 seconds, and immediate free recall for a list of 20 concrete nouns presented sequentially at the rate of 1 per 2 seconds. The results showed that heart rate increased in a dose-related manner for marijuana dosing but not for alcohol. Subjective ratings of impairment were very similar for the high doses of alcohol and marijuana, indicating that subjectively they were equivalent in their perceived strength. Both alcohol and marijuana impaired performance on digit symbol substitution test and immediate free recall. However, time perception and reaction time were not affected by either.

    Berghaus, Kruger, Vollrath (1998) reviewed 66 studies that together provided 761 findings on different measures of perceptual-cognitive-motor performance. As expected, they found that the higher the concentration of THC, the greater the number of measures that were likely to indicate impairment: from 40% of the measures at 5 ng/ml plasma to a high of 70% of the measures at 55 ng/ml plasma. However, results with higher concentrations of THC were based on very few studies and are therefore less reliable.

    Finally, in their analysis of the effects of different drugs on behavioral signs and symptoms recorded by drug recognition experts (DREs), Compton, Shinar, and Schechtman (2000) noted that marijuana caused a slowed pupil reaction to light, an increase in pupil size (both in the light and in the dark), an increase in pulse rate, and poor ocular convergence (of the two eyes toward a close object). Unlike alcohol, marijuana did not produce nystagmus or affect any of the common balance tests (one-leg-stand, finger-to-nose, and walk-and-turn).


    Closed-Course and Driving Simulator Studies

    Several studies have compared driving performance of cannabis-dosed drivers with that of drivers under the influence of either placebo or alcohol. These studies can be divided into two categories: driving in a simulator and driving an instrumented vehicle on the road.

    Smiley et al. (1981) used an interactive simulator and found that in her high- dose condition (200 mcg/kg body weight THC), variability of lateral position in the lane, headway, and velocity increased significantly. Perceptual impairments were also manifested in an increase in reaction time to a subsidiary task, increase in missed turnoffs, and increase in crashes into obstacles on the road. However, a similar study reported by Stein, Allen, Cook, and Karl (1983) found far fewer effects of marijuana dosing. One possible explanation provided by Smiley to account for the difference between her findings and those of Stein's, is that Stein only measured performance over a 15-minute period whereas Smiley measured performance over a 45-minute period. It is then possible that the marijuana effects either increased over time, or that the ability of the drivers to continue to cope with these effects decreased over time. Unfortunately, a temporal analysis of performance over time to test this hypothesis was not conducted in either study.

    The extensive studies by Robbe and O'Hanlon (1993), revealed that under the influence of marijuana, drivers are aware of their impairment, and when the experimental task allows it, they tend to actually decrease speed, avoid passing other cars, and reduce other risk taking behaviors. Given adequate warning, these drivers can also respond correctly and rapidly to dangerous situations. In contrast, the same studies showed that alcohol-impaired drivers are generally not aware of being impaired, and consequently they do not adjust their driving accordingly, and manifest more risk-taking behaviors.

    In her recent review of the significant negative effects of marijuana, Smiley (1998) noted that performance in divided attention tasks is impaired. This is manifested in poorer performance on subsidiary tasks. The implication of this is that in situations where the drivers cannot adjust their speed to accommodate their slowed information processing, marijuana-impaired drivers may be less able to handle unexpected events.

    Two recent studies were conducted on the effects of marijuana and alcohol, alone and in combination, on driving performance. The two studies that used similar levels of alcohol and marijuana doses, but different measures of performance, reached somewhat different conclusions. The first of these studies, by Lamers and Ramaekers (1999) compared the effects of alcohol and THC alone and in combination, on subjectively-rated driving performance scores, relative to a placebo condition in a within-subject design. The 16 subjects (8 males and 8 females) had a mean age of 23, were all occasional users of alcohol and marijuana, and were treated on each session with either placebo and/or low levels of alcohol (.04 BAC) and/or low levels of THC (100 grams/kg THC). Although the levels were low, subjects generally correctly identified if they were truly dosed or not. Their task was to drive through city streets while responding to traffic controls, crossing intersections and making turns at intersections. Using driving instructors' performance scores, Lamers and Ramaekers found essentially no differences between the dosed and non-dosed conditions. However, they also found that drivers under the THC-only condition evaluated their performance as significantly worse than under the placebo, the alcohol and the alcohol+THC condition. Thus, the study confirmed the hypothesis that, unlike alcohol, marijuana actually enhances rather than mitigates the perception of impairment. The only negative behavioral effect of THC was a slight reduction in the frequency of intersections searched for cross traffic (based on the drivers' eye movement records). Although statistically significant, the drop was negligible: from a mean frequency of 85% of the intersections in the placebo condition, to a mean frequency of 82% in the combined alcohol+THC condition. Thus, in general, these results confirmed those of earlier studies with similar levels of THC.

    In the second study, by Hindrik, Robbe, and O'Hanlon (1999), the participants' performance was evaluated in terms of subjective ratings as well as objective measures of lane tracking, maintaining a fixed speed (100 km/hr) and car following headway. The participants were eighteen 20-28 years old Dutch drivers who were moderate drinkers and marijuana smokers. The design was a double-blind crossover, in which each driver received all of the following six combinations of alcohol and marijuana: alcohol placebo+THC placebo, alcohol placebo+100 g/kg THC, alcohol placebo+200 g/kg THC, .04 BAC alcohol+THC placebo, .04 BAC alcohol+100 g/kg THC, and .04 BAC alcohol+200 g/kg THC. The results showed that THC impaired performance on both tasks, and that the effects were synergistic with alcohol. Thus, there was dose-dependent deterioration in lane tracking (both in standard deviation of lateral position and in total time out of lane), which was further exacerbated exponentially with alcohol. Finally, as observed before, the self rating of performance decreased with increasing levels of THC, but was not affected by the alcohol.
    Source:DOT HS 809 642


  3. #19
    Mathematical!! Bugz Champion, Ant Bully Champion, Chainsaw the childern Champion, 3D Net Blazer Champion, Cricket Challenge Champion, Big Uglies Champion, Body Check Champion, Desktop Fishing Champion, All Star Skate Park Champion, Chuckie Egg Champion, Birdy Champion, Anthrax Jelly Champion, Air Typer Champion, Word Pads Champion, Crash Test Dummy Curling Champion, The Mini Jump Game Champion, Chairlift Challenge Champion, Astroboy vs One Bad Storm Champion, Fight Man Champion, Blot In Hell Champion, Beeku Adventure Champion, Connect2 Champion, Atomica Champion, Cannonball Follies 2 Champion, Bada Boing Champion, BeachDefence Champion, Alkie Kong 2 Champion atomik_sprout has become well known atomik_sprout has become well known atomik_sprout has become well known atomik_sprout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    2,643
    Thanks
    235
    Thanked 166 Times in 141 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    I know all that, Hammer. But my point is this: Where are the alleged deaths? I'm no slave to weed, so my judgement is A-OK! My driving skills are impeccable and I've never had issues with them before, sober or high. My reaction time has always been the same. My reflexes are increasing, rather than decreasing, I deal with people the same way I do sober, when I smoke. Nothing about me changes... AT ALL! The only difference is that I'm... High... LOL. I will admit that I am getting a bit deaf though. I won't blame ADD on that one.

    I know what all the scientists think/know. But that doesn't make marijuana any worse than tobacco or alchohol.


  4. #20
    ~always by your side~ Radarix Champion, Virus 2 Champion, Virus 3 Champion fireandice is off to a good start fireandice's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    small little hick town
    Posts
    521
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    Well that's true it isn't any worse for you than tobacco and alchohol. But if it's legal then it will be as bad or even worse than that. We will have the same problems with it as we have with tobacco and alchohol. Why? Because everybody will have easy access to it same as the other stuff. So it's isn't in the best interest to make it avable in stores or even legal.

  5. #21
    ~jUsT sMiLe~ _gwenibe_ may be famous one day _gwenibe_ may be famous one day _gwenibe_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    In the gallery
    Posts
    1,376
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 35 Times in 31 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    But that is YOU, you might think that your not impaired, but not everyone has the same reaction to it as you do, does that mean that we should legalise it? just because you don't react to it and you apparently can drive high - doesn't mean everyone can.

    It is damn obvious that any drug legal or not causes death, wether it be indirect or directly. People do die from drug drivers just the same as they kill people when they are drunk - because people do know that drugs does impair a persons ability to do something. gosh, I've been the unfortunate one to see it. I didn't think any one would have to even need proof for it.

  6. #22
    Otaku Zeikku Shadow is off to a good start Zeikku Shadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Where the frozen tears from the heavens paint everything white.
    Posts
    364
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    I'm sorry, but I do not think it should be legalized.

    However, there are places in Europe where it not only is legal, but sold in shops. You can by it as is, or from shops that specialize in food made from it. Crazy?

    Where I'm originally from liquor is sold in State stores. You can't just get it anywhere. You can imagine my shock when I first saw in available at any store where I live now. You stop to buy some gas, you walk into the station, and there it is! Right next to the Pepsi. It's even in the grocery stores. I'm sure it's that way where many of you live, but being raised somewhere where it wasn't... well it still amazes me.

    If they were to decide to sell it in stores, at least the could control it better. They could regulate the price, and charge taxes. Perhaps they will even devise a way for your car not to start if you've been smoking it. Just like with DUI drivers.

    Alcohol was made illegal through Prohibition, then Prohibition was repealed. I am sure there was a time that marijuana was smoked in the US before it became illegal, but things have a way of changing.

  7. #23
    Thanks for the memories princesslady may be famous one day princesslady may be famous one day princesslady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    In solitude
    Posts
    1,465
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    THIS IS THE DUMBEST QUESTION I HAVE EVER HEARD!
    Person who made this thread, hink long and hard before you ask something like this.

    HECK NO WEED SHOULD NOT BE SOLD IN STORES!

    it is a drug for one and for two, why would one want to buy it where you shop for food and clothes. etc. thats like saying

    "hey mom, ca we got to the weed aisle. i wanna get high."

    "sure hun, after i get some juice and jin."

    That is the dumbest question i heard.

    It is a drug, makes you hillucinate, makes you go crazy sometimes, and minors, let alone people, should NOT have access to it period.

    if it cant be sold on the streets why sell it in stores?

    Born to rule, raised to lead, taught to establish: The African Queen

  8. #24
    Horror movies rule Graveyard Champion Familyguyfan2 may be famous one day Familyguyfan2 may be famous one day Familyguyfan2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Malvern,AR
    Posts
    1,068
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts

    Re: Should weed be sold in stores

    That's a stupid idea. And no it shouldn't. It will just make the potheads happy. Some kids might steal some weed in the store. It will just be easier to get that way. Do u smoke weed lol?

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 13 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. I sold my design as a wallpaper!
    By hapa in forum Graphics, Wallpaper and Web Design
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 06, 2007, 10:53 AM
  2. should weed be legal?
    By setsuna mudo1617 in forum Debate and Discuss
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: Jun 21, 2006, 02:12 PM
  3. Online vs. Stores
    By Joshua001 in forum The Thread Vault
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Dec 27, 2005, 07:48 AM
  4. Ginga Densetsu Weed
    By Shonen in forum The Thread Vault
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Nov 15, 2005, 02:36 PM
  5. Replies: 56
    Last Post: May 16, 2005, 11:48 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts